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Securing SOHOs, Remote Workers and Your Private Data Network

Mobile and small office/home office (SOHO) workers require connectivity to the same resources your campus-based, firewall-protected employees regularly access from the data center, private network, and now increasingly from the cloud. This poses problem and risk: Network IT departments have low visibility into the configurations, security defenses, and points of access for these employees and devices accessing data remotely.

SOHOs and mobile employee workstations consist of affordable, consumer-oriented network equipment (often BYOD) and security software, all of which is not as sophisticated, protectable and secure as the computing tools in corporate offices. Many IT departments, smaller offices, and remote workers are dependent on public Wi-Fi, inexpensive home-based routers, iffy VPN use, and basic-AV-protected computers to protect their confidential internal and customer data at the edge.

The equipment used in the outlying areas of your network represent the weak link for hackers, the low-hanging fruit, increasing the overall security risk for the organization and its B2B/B2C partners. Common risks include spying, infection of connected devices, and the ransoming of the wider network ecosystem. Compromised endpoint network equipment such as computers and routers can set the stage for sophisticated botnet attacks and the spread to other systems, networks and servers, including those of partners.

Are you going to regularly mobilize truckloads out to every possible remote router site to try to secure these new connections? More sophisticated security equipment requires technical expertise, something most home office workers and many branch offices lack. Constant truck-hauls to every distributed site add up from an overall cost standpoint. Bolting on security through software patches can be a struggle, especially when managing updates and renewals across several security vendors and your busy workforce.

In response to these security and cost challenges, best practices for protecting remote equipment endpoints include:

  • Frequent, automatic software updates that don’t harass business-focused, non-technical home officer workers. Leverage security-as-a-service (SECaaS) to rapidly orchestrate and automate advanced security and smart cyber risk management.
  • Virtual firewall as a service (FWaaS) that blocks unwanted traffic from your defined and controllable network endpoints, including wandering user devices.
  • A VPN, or similar secure tunnel, that segments ISP traffic from private network traffic. This VPN capability should be “always on,” noninvasively coating the attack surface and protecting company used-devices from breach and deeper infection.
  • Multifactor authentication (MFA), which helps to ensure the person or system trying to access a device, network or system is the same person or device authorized for access. MFA includes passwords, security tokens, and, in some cases, biometric identification.
  • Cloaking of a device’s and network’s unique identifiers or presence, making it difficult for other people and devices in range to detect.
  • Encryption and private circuit use to mitigate outsiders from viewing, stealing or ransoming sensitive data.
  • Device hardening, so the endpoint can block legacy or unnecessary ports and services that act as doors for easy infiltration.
  • DNS filtering. These are the oft-color-coded listings and commands, which involve preconfiguring devices with software agents to prevent infection from dangerous sites and other network entities.
  • Avoidance of direct peer-to-peer computing or peer-to-private-server communication approaches. Remote Desktop Protocol and similar P2P network services are an easy gameboard for hackers. RDP sessions store credentials which can be stolen and wielded in “pass the hash” attacks. If you use P2P apps, it’s critical to orchestrate advanced, layered security mechanisms, including identity access control, encryption, and zero trust architecture.
  • Seamless support of the latest Wi-Fi authentication and encryption standards, which can help to protect on-device data and access points.

Securing Your Mobile, Remote Workforce

Every digitally transforming organization has its traveling users, the consummate contributors; the mobile warriors. They are a worrisome potential target for close-encounter cyber-takeovers.

Wandering human endpoints access different networks. They use whatever means available to keep their device batteries charged and to stay connected. Sometimes these individuals work in crowded, cramped seating areas where strangers are in physical proximity or router range.

Common behaviors that put remote worker security at risk include:

  • Connecting via unsecure, unencrypted Wi-Fi, or failing to authenticate through the corporate VPN while working from home, in a hotel, or coffee shop. Without the filtering and blocking of a leading firewall or VPN service, the employee can mistakenly land on a phony site or host (e.g., a man-in-the-middle attack), or click on a link from which malware can be delivered, infecting the device and from there seeking to spread.
  • Directly accessing SaaS applications in the cloud beyond the visibility and control of corporate IT security. Employees are at risk of man-in-the-middle attacks in this scenario, and hackers can steal credentials from the endpoint device and use that private data to gain unauthorized entry to cloud servers or back into the enterprise network.
  • Physically plugging into public charging stations, or attaching untrusted devices including other computers, flash drives and USB ports. Conversely, someone else might gain physical access to the network endpoint device and plug in a flash drive or perform some other type of direct tampering.
  • Falling for phishing attacks. Social engineering schemes are getting more effective at fooling curious, emotional human beings into clicking on links that appear to be legitimate but aren’t. These IP spoofing, phishing, and websites appear authentic but have surreptitiously rerouted the user to an ersatz click-on/sign-in with credentials page…

Your mobile warriors need help identifying and avoiding these deceptive man-and woman-in-the-middle attacks.

OPAQ Provides a Secure Access Service Edge Through Security-as-a-Service

Your network’s edge needs easier IT security reinforcement; a cost-effective, circulating burst of easily distributed security-as-a-service software from the cloud.

OPAQ provides strong endpoint protection as a service to ensure secure access at the network edge, empowering what Gartner calls the secure access service edge (SASE). Harness your expanding workforce. To support your remote employees and protect your network and business ecosystem, reinforce protection at the network endpoint and workstation level with help from the cloud.

 

Learn more.

8 Achievable Steps to Remote Security.

Visit our secure access service edge (SASE) page.